Kenosha District Attorney Seeks Arrest And Higher Bond For Kyle Rittenhouse


The office of Kenosha District Attorney Robert D. Zapf is seeking to rearrest Kyle Rittenhouse and increase his bond by $200,000. The district attorney's office filed a motion seeking to increase bond after Rittenhouse reportedly moved to a new address without proper notification. Initially, Rittenhouse provided a home address that was located in Illinois when he posted his $2 million bail. However, prosecutors claim that he was not living at the address when they went to check it out on February 2. In fact, prosecutors claim that he has not lived there for months. Instead, Rittenhouse is reportedly living at a "safe house" in an undisclosed area due to threats made against him.

Rittenhouse is currently facing murder charges after pleading not guilty to driving across state lines and killing two protesters following the Jacob Blake Jr. More recently, Rittenhouse was spotted in a bar wearing a t-shirt that read "Free As F---" while fraternizing with Proud Boys and allegedly throwing up white power signs.

"Rarely does our community see accused murderers roaming about freely," Kenosha County Assistant District Attorney Thomas Binger stated.

At this time, it does not appear that Binger or any of the other prosecutors working on the case have access to Rittenhouse's current address. Binger also claims that Rittenhouse did not pay his bail and therefore has little incentive to comply with the conditions of his bail.

"It is important to note that the $2 million came from a dubious Internet fundraising campaign, and the defendant and his family did not post any money toward that bond. As a result, the defendant is free from custody with minimal incentive to comply with his bond conditions," the motion adds.

"It is important to note that the $2 million came from a dubious Internet fundraising campaign, and the defendant and his family did not post any money toward that bond. As a result, the defendant is free from custody with minimal incentive to comply with his bond conditions."

Now, Judge Bruce Schroeder must decide whether to keep Rittenhouse's address private or request that it be added to public records.


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